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BS/17AL
BS/17AL

BS/17AL


Order-No. 1385139

92,40 € / Piece
incl. Vat. add. delivery
77.65 € excl. Vat
Stock: available but short stock

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Option: cross-over-build

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Details

17AL Loudspeaker assembling kit with Dayton loudspeaker drivers without cabinet

Order-No. 1385139

Features

Wege 2-Wege
Gehäuse Prinzip Bassreflex
Nennimpedanz (Ohm) 6
Kennschalldruck (dB) 82
Höhe (cm) 100,00
Breite (cm) 21,80
Tiefe (cm) 24,20
Anwendung Standlautsprecher
Hersteller / Marke der Chassis Dayton
Preislevel <100 Euro

Picture Item Descr. Price Qty.
2 way small
6,00 € / Piece
incl. Vat. add. delivery
5,04 € excl. Vat
Speaker cable Music Track 215 running meter
1,90 € / Piece
incl. Vat. add. delivery
1,60 € excl. Vat
Speaker cable Music Track 225 running meter
2,20 € / Piece
incl. Vat. add. delivery
1,85 € excl. Vat

Pictures from the Loudspeakerbuilding community to this speaker kit

Corresponding articles from our community

Moritz 17 AL

Moritz 17 AL

 

Inspiration is key, or: the rotated 17 AL


Since I have been listening to more music recently while studying for my exams, and abusing my ears with low-quality PC speakers, I thought it would be nice to listen to music on a decent system again. My last speakers were put out to pasture due to some broken surround material, so I started looking online for reasonably priced free-standing boxes. After a series of detours, I finally ended up here on Udo’s page and clicked my way through the shop and the construction reports. After taking a good hard look at my room (12m²) and my wallet, I dialed down my standards. Given my preferred musical genres (rock, metal) and encouraged by the readers’ comments, I chose the Dayton AL 17.

A simple square cabinet was out of the question for me; inspired by Albrecht Dayton’s inlay, I drew a few sketches that turned the body of the loudspeaker 90°. That would change the cross-section so that when you look straight at the box it simply looks square, while the edge runs across the front in a cosine. The only way to do that, I decided, was to glue the entire loudspeaker cabinet together from many individual layers, each consisting of 4 small slats. In Excel, I created a table with all of the possible angles and lengths; then I was eventually able to calculate the volume by entering the wall thickness, layer thickness, height and edge length. Unfortunately I didn’t think about it long enough and I forgot to calculate one angle, so the curved edge is not cosine-shaped and the wall thickness is not constant as it turns

I chose cherry for the wood, since I still had plenty of sections and rough-edged pieces for cutting out the slats. I started by planning several meters’ worth of slats for the straight pieces of the box (top and bottom), measuring 25x25mm. The slats needed to be a little wider for the curved section.



After cutting the wood to length, I started to build the cabinet out of the many individual slats, layer by layer. I glued 4 slats together into a square, using a jig. The previous layers were then glued onto this frame. I cut the slats for the rotated layers on a band saw, with angles corresponding to the rotation. Constantly referring to my Excel table, I “grew” the rotated section one layer at a time. Once all of the slats were used up, I was finally able to put together the two loudspeaker cabinets, each made from four individual segments. I evened out the insides of the rotated sections using a chisel and a plane, so the cabinets are smooth inside too.



On the outside I first sawed off the projecting corners so that I could trace the curved line of the edge on this curved surface. Using an angle grinder, a circular hand saw, a trim saw and various rasps, files and grinders, I leveled out the many steps and edges and smoothed the cabinet until the even surfaces at the top and bottom flowed into a beautifully curved surface in the middle.



For the floor, I glued in a multiplex board; for the lid, I glued in the same 25x25mm slats, but this time with a mitered edge. After the fine sanding, I treated the cabinet with oil wax. Before applying the last coat, I sanded everything one more time by hand and cut the openings for the speakers and the terminal.



Assembling the crossover and installing all of the components in the cabinet was relatively unproblematic – it was time for a first listen.



When it was connected to a 40-year-old department-store amplifier, I had the feeling – the first time I had ever experienced this with a system – that I needed to turn down the basses (but that was caused by the amplifier). Then we took the speakers to a friend’s house to run them through a high-quality amplifier, and also compared them to some boxes from well-known manufacturers. The sound is just mind-blowing – the high notes are beautifully clean and airy, and the basses offer “pressure” even at low volumes without seeming intrusive or booming. In any case, the sound from this relatively cheap assembly kit made me curious about how good the high-quality Wohlgemuth developed speakers must sound. The speakers have now been set up in my room for several months now, and I’m constantly amazed by the sound – even though they’re still waiting for the right amplifier.



Finally, I want to thank for the unusually fast delivery and for equally fast, friendly help with my questions. These boxes will definitely not be the last ones I build.

Moritz

 

At the request of a reader, Moritz also sent us two pictures of the decorations in the middle of the boxes:





The Dayton 17 AL can be ordered from Intertechnik

Dayton 17 AL

Dayton 17 AL

You can’t plan for the success or failure of a loudspeaker box – something that upsets more than a few retailers who want to plan their purchases in advance based on what is popular with their customers. Always having enough products in stock guarantees satisfied customers who can listen to music just a few days after ordering their new boxes. At this juncture, the Development Department would like to warmly thank our readers; their enthusiasm for the assembly kits presented here shows that we haven’t been tinkering at cross-purposes recently. In large part, our information about what people might like to see comes from the close customer contact with the makers of this magazine. In daily conversations, it is easy to discover what is still missing from our product range. Sure, a glance at our assembly-kit range would have told us that the metal-head faction is strongly underrepresented, while other manufacturers serve this group almost without exception all the way up to the high-price offerings. But it was only the immense success of the FirstTime 8 that showed us the unmet need in this area. That’s why we developed the Dayton 17 AL, a handy free-standing box in the proven 17/ 25 format.

The equipment

Dayton DA 175-8

Measurements as Zip-file

17ALBau_1317ALBau_1417ALBau_15

With the Dayton DA 175-8, we now have a chassis in the product catalogue that certainly makes a good visual impression with its pure aluminum membrane. The black steel basket is sturdy, and it has room for five screws to attach it firmly to the box. The surround material is made of rubber, which contrasts nicely with the large dust cap made of fiber-reinforced paperboard and the shiny silver membrane. The voice coil diameter is 35 mm, and the magnet has a generous hole drilled in it. The chassis does not have any other ventilation openings. Since the DA 175-8 has not yet been reviewed in an individual test, we do have to subject would-be builders to the technical data this time – we owe it to the measurement collectors.

Equipment:

Membrane: Aluminium Air gap height: 6 mm
Surround material: rubber Winding height. 13 mm
Basket: stamped steel Magnet diameter: 100 mm
Polke-piece hole: yes Mounting holes: 5
Centering: raised flat spider Outside diameter: 176 mm
Shielded: no Installation openening: 144 mm
Voice coil: 35 Milling depth: 3 mm
Voice coil former: Aluminium Installation depth: 82 mm

Parameters:

Fs 35 Hz Mms 25,2 grams
Diameter 130 mm BL 7,57 Tm
ZMax 28,5 Ohm VAS 20,6 Liter
Re 5,9 Ohm dBSPL 83,8 dB/1w/1m
Rms 2,54 kg/s L1kHz 0,66 mH
Qms 2,54   L10kHz 0,29 mH
Qes 0,56   SD 133 cm²
Qts 0,45   MMD 24,3 grams
Cms 0,84 mm/N Zmin 6,52 Ohm
DA175_8_Amplitude DA175_8_Impedanz DA175_8_Winkel_0_bis_60_Grad
DA175_8_Klirr_mit_90_dB DA175_8_Sprung DA175_8_Wasserfall


For the tweeter we chose the DC 28 F-8, which made its debut in the March issue’s chassis test.

The cabinet

We calculated the necessary volume at just under 32 liters. For a low-reaching bass, according to our calculations, the reflex balancing should take place at 32 Hz, which we thought was too low for the intended use. A shorter reflex tube (HP 70, full length) created a slight exaggeration at 60 Hz, which completely matched our intent of building a box for people who like to hear a little more bass. The experienced reader will see from the construction drawing that this project has been in the supply closet for a while, since the drawing was created before SketchUp.

Dayton 17 ALBauplan
 

GRAPHIC:

Milling depth bass / Milling depth tweeter: 3mm

Wood list in 19 mm MDF per box:

Sides:2x  100 x 24,2cm

Lid and floor: 2x  18,0 x 24,2cm

Front and rear wall: 2x  18,0 x 26,2cm

Reinforcement boards: 3x 18,0 x 10,0cm

Each box is filled with three bags of Sonofil, which is distributed throughout the entire interior. Rubber feet hold the boxes up off the floor, which will make the rest of the family happy when the offspring decide to listen to a little hip-hop in the next room. But the benefit of interrupting the bass transmission through the floor works both ways, for instance when Dad is seized by the urge to hear his old rock albums. The construction process is documented with the obligatory photos.

17ALBau_01

Smooth assembly depends largely on the mood of the person cutting your wood at the hardware store, since that will determine the quality of the cuts. At my local Praktiker store, I met a saw operator who knew exactly how to cut boards to size. First he calculated how many sections he needed in the 24.2 and 18.0 cm widths; then he cut off the appropriate number of strips from his board without changing the settings, before cutting the second dimension. It’s rare to find a specialist like that at the saw; usually the measuring slide is moved at least twice for every board.

17ALBau_0217ALBau_03

Now it was up to me to continue his good work. Joint glue is applied to the cut edge; the board is set up in its later position and is wiggled back and forth a little to create a film,

17ALBau_0417ALBau_05

then we set the first board on it. The second board creates the right angle and the third one creates the shape,

17ALBau_0617ALBau_07

which is completed by the floor piece. For the reinforcements, we draw on markings with a pencil,

17ALBau_0817ALBau_09

so that they end up in the right spots. Before gluing the last side, we draw an “O” for oben (top) on the front; an “X” would work too, of coursen.

17ALBau_10

After about an hour of drying time, we were able to put the boxes in the cellar, where we did the dustier part of the work. Thanks to the good pre-cutting, there were hardly any edges to sand off. But since all traces of glue need to be removed completely by the sander, don’t get too excited about the small amount of work just yet. It’s helpful to have a band sander or an orbital sander for this step. A sanding block, on the other hand, is good for bodybuilding.


We will devote a separate chapter to the routing process soon. We are always answering questions submitted by email that could not be sufficiently explained during the assembly-kit presentation. So for now, just the short version: use the router template to cut the outer ring for the chassis cutout first, then the hole. Be careful at the point where the router loses its guide, at the latest when the cutout is finished. It’s also fine to cut the inner hole with a jigsaw – it doesn’t look as nice, but it has fewer tonal disadvantages than measurement-related ones. We need one more hole for the connection lines to the tweeter, which can be cut quickly using a rasp or jigsaw.
.


The cross over network

17AL Zweige1

Looking at the aluminum of my DA 175-8, with its volume dropping below the angle even at 1.5 kHz and its subsequent resonances at 8 kHz, I never thought I would be reporting on a completely simple second-order crossover here. But even the first measurements showed me not to be so hasty about throwing around my own prejudices. Despite the separation frequency of 3 kHz, which is relatively high by today’s standards, the peaks completely vanish after filtering. Even the tweeter was satisfied with two components and a voltage divider, and by adding the branches I ended up with a very balanced curve in the wide overlap between 1 and 4 kHz.

Now all I had to do was distribute the parts nicely on a circuit board and weld them on, again using the circuitry plan without component values. As you know, the one with the values only comes with the complete assembly kit.



17ALBau_1117ALBau_12

The crossover was assembled on a preprinted LP-S1 2W circuit board. The connection to the chassis and the terminal comes from the color-coded cable set parts. Both are optional, so you can also glue the parts to a board and connect them by the legs (of the components, naturally, connecting them to your own would be a bad idea).



The Sound

17ALBau_17

By now I’m well qualified to state that buying my Yamaha AV receiver was worthwhile, even though I’ve never watched a movie on it. Recently, we have been making more affordable assembly kits, which don’t necessarily need to be heard on the highest-quality equipment. It wasn’t a pure coincidence – the kits filled in gaps that other sets didn’t necessarily provide. If we take a look at the apparently very similar FT 8, FT 10, Elip 2 and Quickly 36 models, each box fulfilled a different task in the low-price sector. FT 8 is the perfect home theater when supplemented by the FT 8 Top, while Elip 2 has an advantage on the musical level – we even had to give it an impedance correction for tubes, which wasn’t for nothing. FT 10 charms you with its unassuming nature, a real wolf in sheep’s clothing that doesn’t conflict with the Female Factor, and Quickly 36 is an all-around talent that makes great music even with compact systems and that can be supplemented by the Quickly HK, 14 or 18 for a home theater. All that’s missing is a place for the Dayton 17 AL. On a purely visual level, it’s wider than the FT 10, but much shallower, making it the smallest of the boxes named here. Many people consider its silver-colored membrane attractive, which is confirmed by the sales figures for the FT 8. It is delicate compared to the FT8, Elip 2 and Quickly 36 the 17 AL, which is also a good argument for installing it in the living room.

Still, since boxes can’t be judged merely on outward appearance, I naturally also did my usual listening test with the Daytons. The reference to the amplifier earlier was a hint. Even in the radio playback, I was surprised by the newscaster and the reproduction of his “S” sounds, which was unusual for a metal chassis. There was no sharpness, which to be honest I had expected to hear; even at a low volume, his voice didn’t turn into an unclear hiss. So I dared to turn on the CD player and have the laser read a couple of zeros and ones. My Bravo hits came first, because I thought that would be the hardest test. Very compressed music, where everything is the same volume, quickly becomes torturous; but I still listened to Madonna’s song all the way to the end and even understood every word she sang. The bass emphasized her performance in a powerful and amazingly deep way without ever devolving into a droning sound. Moving in a completely different musical direction, Johnny Lee Hooker’s “The Healer” offered slightly less underlying warmth than with the Elip 2, but in exchange, Carlos Santana’s guitar was able to play slightly more in the front. I was very taken with the relaxed, nicely dissolving play of the low-cost tweeter, which offered more fine resolution – without any hardness – than I had expected from it. There was still time for a little good old rock music: “Smoke on the Water.” A cocky electrical guitar, clean bass scales and a taut drumhead on the snare, good room reproduction and offset in depth – what more do you want? Volume? You can have that too!

We haven’t talked yet about the money that changes hands when the loudspeaker is purchased. If you count up all the individual component prices, it comes out to just under 100 euros per box. To facilitate entry into the do-it-yourself world, Intertechnik is offering this more than reasonable set for just 90 euros each. That will make more than just your ears happy
.


 


The technology

Dayton 17 AL

17ALBau_2117ALBau_22

Chassis Dayton DA 175-8 Wood list in 19 mm MDF
  Dayton ND 28 F-8 per box (dimension in cm):
     
Sales Intertechnik Sides: 100,0 x 24,2 (2x)
Construction Udo Wohlgemuth Lid/floor: 18,0 x 24,2 (2x)
    Front/ Rear wall: 18,0 x 96,2 (2x)
Principle Bass-reflex Reinforcement boards: 18,0 x 10,0 (3x)
Nominal impedance 8  
Insulation: 3 bags Sonofil  
Terminal T105/MS/AU  
Reflex port: HP 70/BR unshortened  
Cost assembly kit    
without wood approx.: 60 USD Wood cut: approx. 10 USD

 

17AL_Amplitude 17AL_Imp 17AL_Winkel
17AL_Klirr_mit_90_dB 17AL_Sprung 17AL_Wasserfall



The Dayton 17 AL assembly kit can be ordered from Intertechnik

Chassis Dayton DA 175-8 Holzliste in 19 mm MDF
  Dayton ND 28 F-8 pro Box (Maße in cm):
     
Vertrieb Intertechnik, Kerpen Seiten: 100,0 x 24,2 (2x)
Konstruktion Udo Wohlgemuth Deckel/ Boden: 18,0 x 24,2 (2x)
    Front/ Rückwand: 18,0 x 96,2 (2x)
Funktionsprinzip Bassreflex Versteifungsbretter: 18,0 x 10,0 (3x)
Nennimpedanz 8  
Dämmstoff: 3 Beutel Sonofil  
Terminal T105/MS/AU  
Reflexrohr: HP 70/BR ungekürzt  
Kosten pro Box:    
Bausatz ohne Holz 69 Euro Holzzuschnitt: 15 Euro
I.T. Intertechnik
I.T. Intertechnik Kerpen GmbH Located at Europaring 28, 50170 , Kerpen Germany, . Phone: +490227390840. https://www.facebook.com/Lautsprecherbau https://twitter.com/it_intertechnik https://plus.google.com/111120951705739054145/about https://plus.google.com/102648362843691426793/about https://www.youtube.com/user/lautsprecherbau