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Needle RS100

Needle RS100


Order-No. 1385138

68,00 € / Piece
incl. Vat. add. delivery
57.14 € excl. Vat
Stock: available in: 39 day(s)

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Details

Needle RS100 Loudspeaker assembling kit with Dayton loudspeaker drivers without cabinet

Features

Ways Fullrange
Cabinet prinzip TQWT
Impedance 4
Sensibility (dB) 83
Heigth (cm) 97,00
Length (cm) 14,00
Depth (cm) 19,60
Application Floorstanding
Brand / Manufacture Dayton
Price range <100 Euro

Corresponding articles from our community

Bjorns Needle

Bjorns Needle

 

Dear Loudspeakerbuilding community,

I don’t really know where to start. I didn’t actually know anything about building loudspeakers until just a few months ago. It’s funny that I ended up at this website a little later by coincidence, but there I was, a mechanical engineer excitedly devouring articles about electrical engineering, vibrations and basic acoustic principles.
Soon it was clear to me – I needed to try it out for myself. Looking at the subject from the practical side was probably what I found so exciting. I had caught the bug, and I was gripped by “loudspeaker-building mania.”.

The first question that came up was which box to build. I would have loved to listen to a few of the boxes first and chosen the right one for my needs. But the journey of almost 400 km was just too far for me. So I decided to start small, and I started looking for an affordable, not-too-complicated pair of speakers for my home office because the 2.1 Creative system hooked up to my computer simply wasn’t doing it anymore. Much too bass-heavy! I was having to reset the subwoofer on every third song. After a few days of careful thought and devouring more articles on your page, I noticed the Dayton Needle. Countless positive reader comments and a fairly simple assembly solidified my decision: THOSE WOULD BE MY NEW BOXES.

So, what am I going to need? Let me skip over that part, because other than a cordless screwdriver and a couple of manual screwdrivers, I didn’t own any tools at all… ;-)

Anyway, I ordered the Needle assembly kit, and two days later it was there. Too bad, it was much too early – my vacation didn’t start for another week. But when I unpacked it, there was good news in terms of time management. It was a stroke of luck that the electrolytic capacitors were missing. Otherwise I think nothing could have stopped me from diving right in. A short phone call to Intertechnik, and the problem was soon solved. I want to thank Intertechnik again here for the friendly hotline service and for making it extremely simple to resolve the small shipping error.

1Planning the appearance of the loudspeakers was an ongoing process, and I kept starting over. Inspired by many of the reader reports and after playing around with SketchUp for a while, I came up with the following design. Much to the satisfaction of my girlfriend, it all matched the colors of our living-room décor.

For the material, I wanted to use birch multiplex; that would save me the trouble of veneering it later. In addition, I thought it would require me to paint the front white otherwise. Getting a nice sophisticated shine with clear varnish sounded more like a plan.

Once the plan was set, I started on the practical implementation. For some reason I began with the frequency crossover – why on earth? I had always had trouble with electrical engineering in college. But I should give a little more background here. Weeks earlier, I had forced a work colleague to listen to my constant speeches about the wonderful world of DIY loudspeaker building. He was the one who convinced me to use a circuit board for the crossover. “I have one at home,” he said, “I’ll bring it for you tomorrow.” Long story short, I cobbled everything together and finally attached the electrolytic capacitor and the coil to the board with a little bit of hot glue.

3

The next day, my garage was repurposed as a box workshop. I had already had the boards cut to size at a lumber store. Since I was a little afraid of messing up my whole cabinet with a bad router cut, I started by cutting out the chassis openings on the two front panels. At the top left, in the background, you can see my completely improvised routing template. I was actually planning to build the routing template shown on this website in the workshop practice section, but the hardware store just couldn’t manage to get that stupid aluminum bar within 3 weeks (argh!) and I couldn’t wait any longer (loudspeaker-building fever).

45Next, I started busily gluing. I had bought the express glue from Ponal. It wasn’t really that hard. To make sure everything held firmly, I also improvised a little here and weighed down the glued cabinet with a bag of Ytong mortar left over from a renovation project.

6After I let the cabinets dry for half a day, I had to do the last cutouts. This time the cabinets were already assembled, but by now I had practiced, and everything went well. The connection terminal was larger than the back wall, so the cutouts could only be done when the cabinet was assembled, and I still wanted to add a couple of curves, which are hard to do separately on the individual pieces. I decided on the screw-in version of the cabinet base. I still wasn’t confident in my ability to solder on a crossover without any mistakes, so that would let me access everything easily.

Sanding was the next item on the agenda. It did end up taking a while, but I think the results speak for themselves.

78

The last two project days were spent on painting. First I used painter’s tape to block off the parts of the boxes that weren’t supposed to be white. After two layers of paint, I decided the coverage was good. The hot summer days were perfect, because at 35° C I was able to start on the second coat after just two hours of drying time. To be safe, I did wait 12 hours before putting on the clear coat because that was a little touchier.

991

Finally came the assembly. I used hot glue to attach the crossover to the back wall, just above the connection terminal opening. The clamps already attached to the wiring were used to connect the chassis, and I ended up using the soldering iron again to do the terminal. Finally, I added a little Sonofil to the cabinet. I followed Udo’s instructions precisely, and I paid careful attention to the width of 10 cm. What can I say, I just couldn’t manage it – on two pieces, the width was less than 10 cm. As a result, the strips could slide back and forth. I think that’s exactly why it came with two packages of Sonofil even though you only need one. Oh well, I thought, I’ll just use roughly the full width of a mat (total width of about 35 cm) and try to get three equal strips out of it. The second try worked better, and I was able to clamp the Sonofil between the side walls so nothing slid around anymore. I tightened the last screws, and it was done!!

92I used a Dayton DTA-1 to connect the two speakers to my PC. I’m not a pro by any means when it comes to testing loudspeakers, but I would like to share a couple of my impressions. I did the first listening test with a CD that happened to be lying on my desk: the “Tarantino Experience” sampler. The first song was Bang Bang by Nancy Sinatra; goosebumps is probably the best word to describe it. Her voice was clear as glass, and I couldn’t suppress a grin. It was just amazing how good the distorted electric guitar sounded. What a great sound for such little money (if we generously overlook my investments in the tools). The second CD I put on was from Aerosmith – Pump. When I listened to “Janie’s Got a Gun” a bit louder, I really startled myself at the beginning. I didn’t realize how lifelike the synthesizer sound could be. But that wasn’t all – after all, a PC offers many options beyond just putting in a CD. Recently, I ran across a website where you can put together your own playlists and then listen to them. I thought of Bohemian Rhapsody by Queen, especially the middle part that switches off between a soloist and a chorus and then ends with a one-of-a-kind percussion and guitar section. I have to say I missed the pressure in the bass range a little bit here. Still, the Needle did a great job when you consider the small diameter of the chassis. It may still get a little better once it’s broken in. I wasn’t quite finished listening to the song when my girlfriend came into the room. “Turn it down, you know I don’t like Freddie Mercury’s voice that much. Why don’t you put on Rihanna’s “Te Amo,” she said. I had heard the song plenty of times on the radio, but I had never noticed the great sound of the drums and the fantastic acoustic guitar. You could hear someone clapping, too; suddenly I liked the song.
In summary, all I can say is that I don’t regret my blind purchase. The Needle is exactly what I needed in my office.


Best wishes, 

Björn

93

 

If you would like to build this assembly kit, you can purchase all parts from Intertechnik. 

Ralphs Needle

Ralphs Needle

 

Ralph’s „Danger Girl“ Needles

On the search for a new hobby, I ran across this website. I hoped that building my own loudspeakers would give me a creative, hands-on activity, with the reward of listening pleasure. The Needles assembly kit was a blind, or rather deaf, purchase – I wanted to be surprised..

I had the 16-mm MDF boards cut to size at the hardware store. The only woodworking that I had to do myself was making the round holes in the wood. I did that with a standing drill and a router attachment. It was fairly laborious, and it probably would have been much faster and just as clean to do it with a jigsaw. I glued the wood together, welded the crossovers, installed the chassis elements, put in the insulation material, and my speakers were done. The whole thing was really very easy, and I finished it in an afternoon.

My design was based on the following idea: the surface should have so much detail that at first glance the eye only sees a brightly colored surface. Only up close, upon further inspection, would the individual details become visible. I decided to plaster the boxes with a Danger Girl volume because I liked the way it looked. (I’m neither a comic fan nor a particular fan of Danger Girl). It took me two cans of spray adhesive. If I had to glue anything else, though, I would use something more like paste. The spray adhesive made everything pretty easy, but bubbles kept forming under the paper and I had to press them flat for weeks until they stopped forming. I sealed the whole thing with two coats of clear varnish. The Needles offer plenty of entertainment value just from their appearance.




I run the loudspeakers from a Dayton DTA-1 and a SanClip+ MP3 player. With half a year of experience behind me, let me say this about the sound: the setup is very dependent on the quality of the recordings. Bad MP3s and bad recordings are no fun. With good material, on the other hand, the Needles are a real pleasure. Make sure they’re set up close to the wall. If the boxes are standing in the middle of the room, they just sound flabby. My Needles need a little bit of volume before they sound good. Below a quiet living-room volume, they burble away without attracting too much attention. Only at a reasonable indoor level, and preferably a little higher, do they start to sound really great. A friend and I allowed ourselves the pleasure of pitting the Needles against full-grown pedestal loudspeakers with a 3-way design from a well-known audio shop, in the 400-euro range (for the pair). The whole happening took place with an NAD amplifier and Marantz CD player, along with the aforementioned MP3 player. In my opinion, the high and medium tones are clearly differentiated, with good resolution; the Needles have nothing to hide in this area compared to the larger boxes. The 3-way boxes had more pressure – sometimes even a bit too much pressure for the listening room, which measured about 20 m2. The Needles have a bass that is not exaggerated, but still sounds “nice.” With the electronic music, we wondered where the bass was coming from and how the little wide-range speakers managed it. In the end, I would say that the bass range is a matter of taste.




As so often, these speakers are probably a compromise, and they need to be seen in context. My setup with the Needles, DTA-1 and SanClip+ allows conscious music listening for about 200 euros, and it holds up well against the team of ready-made boxes, NAD and Marantz, which is certainly in the 1000-euro range. It’s truly amazing how much you can get out of these tiny wide-range speakers. Just a couple of words about the DTA1: the striped jack cable (included) is just annoying and should be replaced quickly, and the blue LED is too bright – I covered it with a piece of black electrical tape. I also fed the amplifier a constant stream of batteries even though I was only using it with a power cord. The weight of the 8 batteries makes the device pleasantly heavy. I find the feel of just one control element to be charming. The high indoor volume that I normally use is located at 12 o’clock on the amplifier. In terms of the sound – and in the context of the price – I am very happy. The Needles with the NAD amplifier are even better, especially for deep notes.



In summary, I would like to say that the Needles are a great gateway drug. I am proud of my Needles, and I enjoy showing them off. If making them is more important to you than owning them, I would say the Needles are almost too easy to build. My list for the next project is as follows: Blues Class, recessed chassis, and more complicated carpentry and soldering work. But one thing is clear: I won’t be able to build the loudspeakers in my living room this time.

Ralph

Needle

Needle

 

You just can’t say it loud enough: the creations known as “Needles” have long ago become synonymous in the DIY world with the trick of pulling greatness out of small wide-range speakers. When we measured the small wide-range speakers from Dayton Audio, we thought of the Needle right away. Would they work well enough here, too?

Equipment

BB1The greatest fault of many wide-range speakers in the 4-inch category is their fairly high resonant frequency of more than 100 Hz in most cases. That also applied to most of the chassis elements we tried in the Needle cabinet. Below the “fres,” they just don’t put out any sound worth mentioning. You can imagine how happy we were when our impedance measurements for the two RS 100 models peaked at 79 and 74 Hz. After all, that’s almost 40 Hz lower than the products that made the Needle famous.

A stable die-cast basket with six screw holes and narrow bars, ventilation and phase plugs drilled from solid material are the shared characteristics of the shielded eight-ohm RS 100 S-8 and its four-ohm counterpart, the RS 100-4 without a shield. The aluminum membrane has a shiny black coating to protect it from noticeable resonance peaks in the upper frequency range, and the rubber surround material allows for a large lift. Of the two RS 100 models, we chose the 4-ohm version because it has the three-dB-higher efficiency level with the same amplifier output.


Data sheet

RS 100-4


BB2BB3

RS100_4ZeichRS100_4_01


Approx. price: 30,00 EUR/USD

Item No.: 1381990

Measurements as a zip-file



Equpment:

Membrane: aluminium, coated Air gap height: 4 mm
Surround matetial: rubber Linearer motion: 4 mm
Basket: die cast Magnet diameter: 70 mm
Pole piece hole: yes Mounting holes: 6
Centering: raised flat spider Ouside diameter: 98 mm
Magnetig shielding: no Installation opening: 78 mm
Voice coil: 26 mm Milling depth: 3 mm
Voice coil former: Aluminium Installation depth: 51 mm

Parameters:

Fs 74,3 Hz Mms 3,9 grams
Diameter 70 mm BL 2,94 Tm
ZMax 13,1 ohm VAS 2,43 liters
Re 3 ohm dBSPL 84 dB/1w/1m
Rms 0,85 kg/s L1kHz 0,08 mH
Qms 2,14   L10kHz 0,06 mH
Qes 0,63   SD 38 cm²
Qts 0,49   MMD 3,76 Grams
Cms 1,18 mm/N Zmin 3,3 ohm

 

RS100_4_Amplitude RS100_4_Imp RS100_4_Winkel
RS100_4_Klirr_mit_90_dB RS100_4_Sprung RS100_4_Wasserfall


Cabinet

Anyone who simply uses other people’s intellectual property online can quickly earn a justified lawsuit from the rights owner. Although we were confident Berndt wouldn’t file a lawsuit against us, we naturally asked him whether we could use his Needle diagram for our Dayton project. “Of course,” he responded. We’ve known each other for years now, so we weren’t really surprised by his answer.

But you know how it is when you think you can do everything better – naturally we had to play around with the diagram a little bit, and we built the sides, lid and floor from 25-mm MDF, which gives the box more weight and stability. We didn’t change anything on the inside – well, except for the position of the insulating material. We cut a Sonofil mat into three strips, 10 cm wide. We put one in the front chamber and two in the rear chamber. The front strip and the top rear strip came together at the lid.

Needle-cabinet assembly plan as a Sketchup-file

Cross over

Weiche klein
Vergleich

Reporting on the crossover for a wide-range speaker is not an evening-long production. As a rule, it consists of three parts that are connected in parallel in the signal path. Their function is limited to balancing out the volume increase caused by reflections on the baffle board by way of a controlled increase in resistance. The RS 100-4 also required this type of correction, since its frequency curve shows a long bulge from 400 to 5000 Hz. Here we had to make a moderate intervention, particularly including the area around 3 kHz in the reduction. The ear is sensitive to any exaggerations in this range, which it perceives as annoying and bothersome. I also could have worked on the peak at 18 kHz, but since it doesn’t even show up in the distortion curve and disappears with a small angle, I saved myself the extra parts. We saved the measurements for the two wide-range speakers used in the original Needle on our computer, which were recorded under similar conditions and even using the same hardware and software. The benefit in the bass range is clear from the much lower resonant frequency of the Dayton BB. In the overall curve, too, the American part has a much more balanced line, without the waviness of the other two chassis elements. Berndt used the loudspeaker responsible for the red curve without an anti-resonant circuit, and the other one with the circuit.


WeicheNeedle1WeicheNeedle2

Sound

NeddleText3
People who trick others are not normally popular folks, we agree whole-heartedly. But because the intentions were good, we have decided to absolve ourselves in this particular case. We had just made the Needles available for a listening test in the shop when the phone rang; at the same time, Michael walked into the studio. During the phone call, we turned on our KT 88, put “Acoustic Live” by Nils Lofgren in the CD player and played “Keith Don’t Go” without commentary. When we finally turned our attention to the visitor, he said, “If those had been around when I was building my Duetta, I would have considered them too.” Now, what you need to know is that a newly developed tall free-standing box happened to be standing next to the Needle, and Michael assumed it was responsible for our listening enjoyment. His incredulous face had a bit of the embarrassed look that one always has at being caught out, when we showed him where the cables were connected. “Oh well, you fooled me pretty well with guitar music, but if there had been just a hint of bass, that little box would have conked out.” But after the beginning of Patricia Barber’s “Use Me,” with a plucked contrabass and creaking strings very clearly hitting the wood, he was speechless. A day later he sent us an email: “…after I got home, I did a listening test with the Duetta right away, and sure enough: there was much more to be heard. Clear, airy high notes and a true, clean bass (but the fat one is really good at plucked basses). The Duetta was the right choice after all!! It’s like you once said: the missing parts are not disruptive; what’s annoying is the excess. (At least as long as there’s not too much missing.) Anyway, it’s a great sound for a very small price, that Needle with Dayton.”


Having gotten a taste for this little experiment, we continued to test our customers. We consciously and very intentionally did not take advantage of the fact that people don’t expect much from small boxes and are then blinded by the results. Our visitors were convinced that they were listening to large boxes, and they were far from complaining about any missing bass. Of course we kept the volume low enough that the little wide-range speaker wasn’t overwhelmed, but with four millimeters of lift you can get well above a reasonable living-room volume”. The voices, room and localization, the representation of quiet sounds even with a large orchestra, fascinated all of the listeners equally. In the end, Charly, without consulting his father first, said, “It’s outrageous how much it’s showing off!”


Of course we can’t accept this great compliment just for ourselves; we are only responsible for a small part of the boxes’ success. Berndt did the calculations for a terrific cabinet, without which the good work of Dayton’s chassis developers would only have resulted in a conventional shelf loudspeaker. It would have languished in a little box, once again heralded as the end of the squallbox. All of these fortunate circumstances coming together made for an incredible box at a small price. We’re sure you can settle it into your living room as a “can opener” for larger projects – just ask my wife.



Data sheet

Needle RS100-4

Chassis: 1 x Dayton RS 100-4 Wood list:
     
Sales: Intertechnik, Kerpen 16, 19, 22 oder 25 mm MDF:
Construction    
 Enclosure box: Berndt Burghard 90,0 x 19,6 (4x) sides
 Cross over: Udo Wohlgemuth 15,0 x 19,6 (4x) lid/ floor
     
Function principle: TQWT 12 mm MDF:
Nominal imdedance: 4 Ohm  
Damping/insulation: 1 Matte Sonofil 90,0 x 10,0 (2x) back wall
Terminal T105/MS/AU 87,5 x 10,0 (2x) front
    77,7 x 10,0 (2x) back divider
Approx cost per box:   4,2 x 10,0 (2x) bottom divider
Assembling kit 50,00 EUR/USD  
Wood cutting: 10 EUR/USD  
NeddleText2NeddleText1
Neddle_Amplitude Needle_Winkel Needle_Impedanz
Needle_Klirr_mit_90_dB Needle_Sprung Neddle_Wasserfall


If you want to build the Needle by yourself you can by the assembling kit here.

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