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FT11
FT11
FT11
FT11
FT11
FT11

FT11

Cinema feeling

Order-No. 1385238

182,00 € / Piece
incl. Vat. add. delivery
152.94 € excl. Vat
Stock: available

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Details

FT11 Loudspeaker kit with Gradient Select loudspeaker drivers without cabinet

Order-No. 1385238

Features

Wege 3-Wege
Gehäuse Prinzip Geschlossen
Nennimpedanz (Ohm) 4
Höhe (cm) 59,80
Breite (cm) 28,60
Tiefe (cm) 33,60
Anwendung Heimkino
Besonderheiten Modular Aufbau
Hersteller / Marke der Chassis Gradient
Preislevel 100-200 Euro

Pictures from the Loudspeakerbuilding community to this speaker kit

FT11 (Pre-)Finish by Schubbcasten
FT11 front by rudi65
Alfs FT11 by Alf
Alfs FT11 by Alf

Corresponding articles from our community

Bothos one piece FT11

Bothos one piece FT11


Bothos FT11

 

It all started so harmlessly. I actually just wanted new speakers for my desk so that I can enjoy the music and not get just a droning in my ears. After some searching and then a lot of reading, the Quickly 14s took their place with me in the basement. Normally, this would have been the end because the plan was carried out. Not so, if you come in contact with loud speaker construction in general and the creations mentioned in this loudspeaker construction magazine in particular.

While listening to music, I sat at my desk and mused about what the next project would be at the change the year 12/13. I wavered between the various types. Quickly 28, Vota 3, FT 11. At the end I chose deaf blind the FT11.



For me, it was the best compromise between price and performance. That is surely very relative. But somehow you have to decide. Unfortunately I didn't have time for a visit to Bochum. So it had to be my gut feeling. In addition to the price/performance ratio, the size speaks for it. I was tired of just standing around and wanted to have something solid in my room.

So I went back to work and started up the Sketchup. My goal was to take not the original size, but to accommodate everything in one cabinet. Added to this was still my requirement to make the cabinet as narrow as possible. When drawing, I pondered whether 2 or 3 mm partitions between the recessed TT chassis and the edge of the baffle would be enough. Nothing ventured, nothing gained.



The complete plan can be downloaded from the SketchUp Gallery by all registered users.

 

I chose birch MPX for the wood. It offers the advantage of being relatively easy to work on in the finishing process. The cutting was once again a matter of 15 minute with the friendly beaver* around the corner.  After the first production mistakes, I had to find out now what jobs had to be done how and make it all fit with all the grains running in the right direction. But even the best plan and the most accurate cutter does not matter if you use false logic and write down the wrong numbers. So put back on the bike and have 2 new boards cut…

(* =carpenter)

 

I won't go into details about the assembly. It has already been described often enough. But you should be careful what you use to weigh it down and when it can turn into too much weight. In its semi-finished state, I sealed the whole box including the fire extinguisher and clamps from the table. Except for a small kink on one side wall, nothing was left.





Parallel to the construction of the cabinets, I soldered the crossovers. It was not rocket science due to Intertechnik's good crossover plan. All finished, they shone in a state of operational readiness and like twins sitting on my desk, waited to finally move into their homes.



I could not wait for this move either and tinkered all the faster. The milling of the chassis cutouts went quickly by the hand and it all fit together. Unfortunately, I realized that my old cheap router wobbled and the cutouts were more oval than round. Fortunately, you don't see that from a listening distance! Yet a new Bosch machine was purchased for further processing, which has worked well since then.

The first cabinet was barely finished when I had to try it out. So everything soldered, screwed together, connected... then madness! Up to now, I had thought that the Quickly 14s were a giant leap. But here the ante was upped again decisively. The volume impressed from the first moment. Nothing boomed, nothing thudded. Simply a snappy bass. How they sounded in stereo and after 50 hours of listening to music? Now quickly finish the second cabinet and then finally enjoy them in stereo. And soon I was overtaken by the horror of many self-builders. The rough cabinets are finished and you want to hear just a little sample. Already they're standing there unfinished because you don't want to miss the beautiful sound. For me, this phase lasted 4 weeks at least.

Then everything out and the cabinet went into the workshop. Now they just stood there and waited and waited and waited. In the meantime, I had to deal with other things. I changed my work room, became self-employed and Christmas was on the way. And again nothing happened. They had to wait a while. Because the cabinet was completely enclosed, I could not even use it as Nativity manger under the tree. And then came the Christmas holidays. I was able to get away for an hour here and there to grind and oil the cabinet.



The surface should be slightly darker. Finally, I choose a coat of OSMO decor wax. Then I've oiled it again. At a possible next time in the future, I'll directly stain but correctly. The result will certainly be more even because the stain penetrates deeper into the wood and thus reacts less sensitively to grinding.



After a week of skiing and a forced drying break, I could now finally insert the chassis again and could listen to the sound of the FT 11 for the first time in six months. I was completely flabbergasted just like the first day. The Quickly 14s could simply not produce this volume and power.



I immediately grabbed my computer and the MP3 collection and looked for some good reference songs. They had always impressed me with their speed, clarity and dry tuning. Others are probably more into a bellied bass. But I think they are well matched. You realize that everything except maybe modern pop music has less bass. How will an orchestra produce giant bass thunderstorms without an organ! And no bass is needed in jazz with whisks which punches you in the gut. But if the FT11 want to, they can hit pretty hard.

I was now sitting there, the family was already in bed and dreaming of white ski slopes and I was listening to my reference songs. Beginning with "Tricycle" by Flim & The BB's. There, you can feel how dynamic the speakers are after just 18 seconds. Cleanly beating drums in combination with well played bass mercilessly reveals tired chassis. It continues with "The Expert" by Yello. If you didn't know before what is deeper bass without booming is, you should play this song. Deep voices and extremely low played bass show what can come out of the two Gradient W 218-8s if you just let it. But can the large FT 11s also do large instruments? Sure. Cameron Carpenter played his "Lovesong No. 1" on the organ and show what you can get out of an organ using your feet. With closed eyes and opened ears, you sit in the middle of the nave and feel the waves flow over you. So, that is a stage with speakers. Now I know it.

 

 

 

It continued with the following songs that were able to convince all of the candidates:

Get lucky by Daft Punk
Crystallizer by Lindsey Stirling
Für Frauen ist das kein Problem [For women, this is not a problem] by Max Raabe]
Keith don’t go by Nils Lofgren
I couldn't care less by Leslie Clio
Mediterranean Sundance + Rio Ancho by Paco de Lucia, Al di Meola and John McLaughlin
Sultans of Swing by Dire Straits
Behind the wheel by Depeche Mode



After the ears get accustomed to the clarity, everything fits together. This is the way to play the music!

Now I will continue to read in the forum again and think about what the others are presenting. Let's see what's up next in my workshop.

@ LoudSpeakerBuilding.com team: A thousand thanks for the support including the fastest response to questions. That's service!


Botho

 

Piotrs FT11

Piotrs FT11

 

Every year I read through the various do-it-yourself loudspeaker projects and then give up on the idea a few weeks later, since I don’t have enough space or very many tools at home. This time, though, I was so fired up about doing a project that I was finally ready to build my own speaker boxes. How hard can it be to glue a few boards together?

Sketchup file for the tower for anyone who wants to build one.

Then it was time to go to the hardware store, where the nice lady in the wood department worked hard to make sure the boards were cut exactly to size. At home, I started gluing boards right away. Barbell weights gave me the pressure I needed to hold them in place. Maybe not the best solution, but it worked well anyway. Thanks to fast-drying glue, I finished the gluing pretty quickly. 



I gave the front to a cabinetmaker in my area, since I don’t have a router or the necessary experience to countersink the speakers. I used the extra time to tackle the frequency crossovers. I had some Plexiglas at home and figured that would work well. 



So far so good!

The phone rings, and there’s a guy with a very smoky voice on the other end – the cabinetmaker. There follows a conversation in which he tries to explain to me that you can’t mill the fronts without a CNC, and that he’s going to need at least 2 days to do it. At €50 an hour, he says, I can imagine how much that’s going to cost me. He advises just buying some speakers from the nearest electronics store. When I suggested using the router and a router compass, his only response was, “That won’t work.” I probably don’t need to explain that I was fairly upset with him. 

After thinking about it for a while, I just decided not to countersink the speakers. It wouldn’t look that bad, I thought, and besides I could hardly wait to hear how they sounded. So I powered up my jigsaw and did the front plate myself. Since I wasn’t 100 percent successful and I was afraid of not being able to fit the speakers tightly into the cabinet, I also made a second front plate out of 5-mm-thick MDF and simply glued it on top. I made it an extra 1 mm too big in every direction, since the cabinet still had a few overhanging edges once I had finished gluing it together. Now I could putty the gaps and then just sand everything down so it was smooth.

Next it was time for the bevels. I looked at another project in this magazine for guidance, and used aluminum profiles as the guide rails. Then I got down to work with the handsaw.

Next came the sanding (by hand). About 2 hours later, it looked like this.



After that, it was time to paint. I used a store-brand primer from my hardware store and then a 2-in-1 paint that also works as a primer (also a store brand). The saleswoman told me it would keep the wood edges from showing through so much. I applied all of the paint with a roller. 



Two primer coats and four paint coats later, I was ready to start installing the crossovers. I screwed in the terminals and stuffed in the Sonofil (amazing how much Sonofil that is). Finally, I soldered on the loudspeakers and screwed them in tightly. Naturally, I drilled some holes for the screws first. Done! 


Very pleased with myself, I mounted the two boxes right on my amplifier and turned on the music. What can I say? I was and still am speechless! Unfortunately I can’t draw any comparisons, since I’ve never heard any of Udo’s other speakers, but I can say one thing for anyone who is new to do-it-yourself projects. DIY is worth it! The sound is great, and for me as a hip-hop/minimal/drum&bass listener, the bass on the FT 11 is a dream, too. How on earth did I listen to music on YouTube before? Now I’m a fan of closed bass cabinets, and I have banished by 15” subwoofer from my setup altogether. No more buzzing bass and no more perceived delays in the low range – everything is very precise and yet still deep. 

Now my friends always want to watch movies at my place, and I’m thinking about adding a center and rear speaker to the system. Let me just wrap up my construction report with what a friend said when she heard it: “WOW! Do you feel that?! The floor!” 

Follow-up: Upgrading to 5.0


Of course, my construction urge didn’t go away – on the contrary. I could hardly wait to build some more speakers. I could now enjoy the full range of sound when listening to music, but what I was missing were some additional effects speakers for watching movies. So I opened SketchUp again and came up with the following:

Sketchup files FT 11Center and Rear for anyone who wants to build one.


The assembly process was exactly the same as for the tower cabinets, so I’ll spare you the extra pictures and just show the finished speaker cabinets. 


What can I say? It sounds great! Watching and/or listening to movies is a lot more fun now. Let me close my sound review with another quote: “Tell me, do you even enjoy going to the movies anymore? It sounds miles better at your place.” Well, if that doesn’t inspire you to try out one of Udo’s assembly kits yourself, I don’t know what will! 



Now I’m hoping that Udo will come out with the matching subwoofer at some point so I can upgrade to 5.2 one of these days. But I would have to find a new place to live first, since the 5.0 setup is more than powerful enough for me to feel the movie explosions. And if my floor is vibrating already, I’m sure my neighbors are starting to notice it, too!

Piotr

The assembly kits are available from Intertechnik:


FT 11

FT 11 Top

Ft11

Ft11

 

Now they’re almost all back on the market – the economical Quicklies and FirstTimes that we’ve been publishing constant updates for during the last few months, with the new Gradient Select chassis. We finally finished this somewhat retrograde activity for the replacement types; the FT 4 and in particular the FT 6 are still missing, but they probably won’t be needed any more in their previous form. We can skip the FT 4 sequel box because it doesn’t fill any significant gaps in our offerings compared to the FT 2 TL and the Quickly 36, and the very popular FT 6 will finally be laid to rest. It will be resurrected at the appointed time with a new chassis and a modified cabinet. Still, these revitalized assembly kits do not yet explore the full palette of possible constructions for the extremely cost-effective Selects. On the contrary, it’s time to start thinking of them not just as a stand-in for older products. Building new things is much more fun than just following the same old narrowly defined steps on a worn dance floor, navigating among the ex-boxes. The Quickly 28 will now be followed by the first completely new assembly using the Select chassis. I almost spent more time thinking about its name than I did about our latest creation – it must have been too obvious: FirstTime 11.

Equipment

Speakers that do not have a fully developed job are almost impossible to sell these days. We found this to be true again and again – only after a construction plan is published are people suddenly interested in them. This clearly shows that people are much more likely to build something from a pattern than to invent it themselves, so it was a good idea on our part to create an online magazine about speaker construction. As our forum shows, more and more beginners are finding their way to us, where more experienced readers encourage them to build their own boxes for the first time. A simple assembly and a good price are important, since often people start out not with the highest quality but according to their own ability to build a halfway decent wooden package with the tools at hand. That’s the main task of the FirstTime series, which is additionally distinguished by a wide range of expansion levels. It was also the goal for the FT 11, a two-part three-way combination of the W 218-8, W 115-8 and GDT 104 N. We have often referenced the data sheet for the tweeter – it can be found in the chassis test for the April 10 edition. The two partners have not been introduced before; we’re providing their data again here for the holdouts who still want to build everything themselves.

W 115-8
Item No.: 1381653

Price: 13,50 € 15,00 USD
Measurements
as Zip-file



Equipment:

Membrane: coated paper Air gap height: 4 mm
Seal: rubber Winding height: N/A
Basket: steel Magnet: ferrite
Pole-piece hole: no Mounting holes: 4
Centering: raised flat spider Outside diameter: 117 mm
Magnetic shielding: no Installation opening: 94 mm
Voice coil: 25 Milling depth: 4 mm
Bobbin: Aluminium Installation depth: 54 mm


Parameters:

Fs 99 Hz Mms 6,0 grams
Diameter 84 mm BL 4,78 Tm
ZMax 22 Ohm VAS 1,81 liters
Re 6,4 Ohm dBSPL 84,3 dB/1w/1m
Rms 1,46 kg/s L1kHz 0,36 mH
Qms 2,59   L10kHz 0,21 mH
Qes 1,05   SD 55 cm²
Qts 0,75   MMD 5,8 grams
Cms 0,42 mm/N Zmin 6,9 Ohm


Measurement:

     
 Frequency response and phase  Impedance  Distortion for 90 dB
     
 Frequency response under 0/ 30/ 60°  Step responce  Waterfall


W 218-8
Item No.: 1381659
Price: 23,70 € 26,00 USD
Measurements
as Zip-file




Equipment:

Membrane: coated paper Air gap height: 6 mm
Seal: rubber Winding height: N/N
Basket: steel Magnet: ferrite
Pole-piece hole: no Mounting holes: 4
Centering: raised flat spider Outside diameter: 218 mm
Magnetic shielding: no Installation opening: 184 mm
Voice coil: 25 Milling depth: 4 mm
Bobbin: aluminum Installation depth 84 mm


Parameters:

Fs 38 Hz Mms 30,2 grams
Diameter 164 mm BL 8,96 Tm
ZMax 43 Ohm VAS 36,2 liters
Re 6,2 Ohm dBSPL 87,6 dB/1w/1m
Rms 2,09 kg/s L1kHz 0,84 mH
Qms 3,45   L10kHz 0,43 mH
Qes 0,56   SD 211 cm²
Qts 0,48   MMD 28,4 grams
Cms 0,58 mm/N Zmin 6,98 Ohm


Measurements:

     
 Frequency response and phase  Impedance  Distortion for 90 dB
     
 Frequency response under 0/ 30/ 60°  Step response  Waterfall


Cabinet

When you look at the parameters for the W 218-8, they seem to cry out for a transmission line. We had already more or less ruled that out when we took the FT 4 out of the product lineup. But anything that fits in a running line usually also works in a closed system. LspCAD wanted 30 liters for an installed rating of 0.707, but I was happy with a QBox of 0.8, where the volume could be shrunk to two-thirds the size. Given the price of 23.70 euros for the W 218-8, I didn’t need to think about it for long, and there were two in every box. I built my little cabinet, measuring about 60 (H) x 30 (W) x 34 (D) cm, with 18-mm beech plywood – even though I often warn people about the hazards of using real wood. I like the wood, and my warnings haven’t come true yet for either the FT 9 or the Symphony 5. I also used a pair of mid-range speakers in a closed cabinet measuring less than 5 liters. I only glued in reinforcements in the bass housing. Both box parts are completely filled with Sonofil – the bass section uses four bags, and the upper section uses one bag. The construction plans are once again available as zipped SketchUp files.



Crossover

Now it’s time to talk a little bit about our plans for the FT 11; the reader probably already suspects this, but the two-part structure comes from an expansion concept. The first step was to start with something very easy, simply designing a two-part three-way box. But this requires something special, too: most beginners are looking for a box combination that can use an AV receiver and thus brings in the peripheral equipment. Our goal was to make the upper section of the FT 11 usable as both a center and rear – I’ll just come out and say it: it uses the same crossover. It just leaves out the high-pass filter and the filter for the basses. 



The branch curves for the two parallel basses and mid-range speakers have a fairly large overlap; an ideal addition results when the lower sections are reverse-connected with the rest. To this end, the W 218-8s were given a filter made of a coil and a capacitor, while the W 115-8s only have a smooth electrolytic capacitor. They are also satisfied with a second-order low-pass filter at the top. A more meticulous crossover developer might have removed the small peak at 3.5 Hz by adding many more components, but I skipped that step for cost reasons. Other people are welcome to put together a crossover with parts that are much more expensive than the chassis itself. Naturally I also decided against pretending that more expensive coils and capacitors, which salespeople often refer to as “high-end,” guarantee better sound quality. The one slightly more expensive piece in the tweeter’s 12dB network is an MKP-Q4, which only costs one Euro more than the corresponding smooth electrolytic capacitor but does in fact add sound quality that is worth the extra price.



Since there was nothing to photograph while assembling the boxes, I seized the opportunity to take some more pictures of the crossover and chassis installation. In my experience this is the biggest hurdle for first-time builders to overcome. These photos are intended to lower that hurdle.


Gebaut, geschliffen, gefräst und geölt waren die vier Kästen in sechs Stunden.Die Weichen habe ich beschriftet, so wissen die Kabel, wohin sie gehörenHeißkleber kommt auf das Bassweichenbrett, danach die Weichen unterhalb der Versteifung auf die Rückwand des BassabteilsDie rechte Anschlussdose sorgt für die Verbindung zum Verstärker, die linke zum Oberteil. Dort ist der Hochpass-Kondensator angelötet. Verbunden sind die beiden Terminals mittels eines Kabelpaares, das Plus mit Plus und Minus mit Minus verbindetVier Beutel Sonofil ist zwar viel Stoff, aber die müssen in die Basskiste rein.An den unteren Bass habe ich ein Kabelpaar von der Weiche und eins zum oberen Bruder gelötetAuch die Mittel-Hochtionweiche wird mit heißkleber auf die Rückwand geklebtEine Matte Sonofil liegt unter jedem W115-8Die BMT werden wieder parallel geschaltet, bevor alle Chassis eingeschraubt werden. Vorbohren ist gerade bei Leimholz PflichtDie beiden Gehäuse werden mit einem Kabel verbunden, das wegen der Schönheit verdrillt wurdeZwei schwarze MDF-Bretter heben den Hochtöner auf Ohrhöhe

The black boards on the sides of the top speakers are omitted for the center and rear ones; the main sound system’s tweeter should be installed at a 90-degree rotation if the cabinet will be used on its side.

Measurement diagrams, FT 11 Top

     
 Frequency response and phase  Impedance  Frequency response under 0/ 30/ 60°
     
 Distortion for 90 dB  Step response  Waterfall


Measurement diagrams, FT 11

     
 Frequency response and phase  Impedance  Frequency response under 0/ 30/ 60°
     
 Distortion for 90 dB  Step response  Waterfall


Sound

Sometimes it’s a good thing, when I’ve put together a new pair of speakers, that there’s a more or less public listening room in Bochum. Anyone who happens to stop by is a welcome critic, and they can help keep me from overlooking the faults in my speakers. But what I experienced this time was completely new for me. Zeppi interrupted me as I was running down the bass for being not quite as dynamic and transparent as it had been recorded on the CD: “You shouldn’t always be so critical of your beginner boxes. There’s no question that Duetta can do more. But I can think of plenty of highly acclaimed boxes – both assembly kits and ready-made ones – that would be happy to have just a fraction of the FT 11’s sound quality.” “That’s right!” added Dirk, “the music doesn’t stick to the boxes, and it’s rare to hear such good mid-range quality from a 10-euro chassis.”

I’ll just leave that as it is and save myself further descriptions – after those reviews, how can I go on and say that the high range isn’t as delicate as with the ER4 or Zeppi’s favorite, the 26 HD 1? After all, with an Airmotion transformer you get a pair of three-way boxes with five chassis elements per side. It’s also more fun to listen to music with the complete FT 11 than with two ceramic cones that come in at the same price, but without any bass or mid-range. Rock, pop and chart hits don’t reveal any defects in the boxes; I’m a little spoiled with classical and jazz, but then you don’t need an AV receiver, either. The performance is respectable when it comes to experiencing movies – four twenties are pretty powerful even in their small enclosed chambers. If you want to change the bass level, you can connect the FT 11 to newer 7.1 amps in BiAmping mode and run the upper parts without a high-level filter. The next step will be to expand the FT 11 – I have plenty of new ideas now. 



FirstTime 11

Chassis 2 x Gradient W 218-8 Wood list with 18-mm wall thickness
  2 x Gradient W 115-8 per box (bass section)::
  1 x Gradient GDT 104 N  
    59,8 x 28,6 (2x) front/back wall
Sales Intertechnik, Kerpen 59,8 x 30,0 (2x) sides
Construction Udo Wohlgemuth 25,0 x 30,0 (2x) lid/floor
    25,0 x 10,0 (1x) reinforcement
Function principle closed   5,0 x 30,0 (1x) reinforcement
Nominal impedance 4 Ohm  
Insulation: 5 bags Sonofil Top part:
Terminal 3 x T56/ 56 DB 39,6 x 14,8 (2x) front/back wall
    39,6 x 11,2 (2x) sides
Approx. cost per:   11,2 x 11,2 (2x) lid/floor
Assemply kit: 156 EUR 170 USD  
    Milling depths:
    Bass and Midbass: 4 mm
Wood cutting: 20 EUR 22 USD Tweeter:   3 mm




FirstTime 11 Top

Chassis 2 x Gradient W 115-8 Wood list with 18-mm wall thickness
  1 x Gradient GDT 104 N Per box (top part):
     
Sales Intertechnik, Kerpen 39,6 x 14,8 (2x) front/back wall
Construction Udo Wohlgemuth 39,6 x 11,2 (2x) sides
    11,2 x 11,2 (2x) lid/floor
Function principle closed  
Nominal impedance 4 Ohm Milling depths:
Insulation: 1 bag Sonofil Bass mid-range: 4 mm
Terminal T56/56 Tweeter:   3 mm
     
Approx. cost per Box:    
Assembly kit 66 EUR 70 USD  
    Wood cutting: 7 EUR 8 USD

Assembly kits available from Intertechnik
FT 11           (floorstanding; top and bass module)
FT 11 Top   (top module and center; possible later upgrade to FT11 with bass module)

Home theatre

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Front
Center
Sub
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Rear
Rear
I.T. Intertechnik
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