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Elip2

Elip2

small price - big dreams

Order-No. 1385137

158,50 € / Piece
incl. Vat. add. delivery
133.19 € excl. Vat
Stock: available

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Details

Loudspeaker kit Elip 2 with Seas and Gradient loudspeaker drivers, without cabinet
Youtube_preview_image
Youtube_preview_image
Youtube_preview_image
Youtube_preview_image

Order-No. 1385137

Features

Wege 2-Wege
Gehäuse Prinzip Bassreflex
Nennimpedanz (Ohm) 4
Kennschalldruck (dB) 90
Höhe (cm) 120,00
Breite (cm) 20,00
Tiefe (cm) 30,00
Anwendung Standlautsprecher
Hersteller / Marke der Chassis Gradient
Preislevel 100-200 Euro

Picture Item Descr. Price Qty.
2 way small
6,00 € / Piece
incl. Vat. add. delivery
5,04 € excl. Vat
Elip 1
Clear business
104,30 € / Piece
incl. Vat. add. delivery
87,65 € excl. Vat
ElipCenter
Fitting center for Elip 1 and 2
158,00 € / Piece
incl. Vat. add. delivery
132,77 € excl. Vat

Pictures from the Loudspeakerbuilding community to this speaker kit

Elip2_Natur by janosch
Elip 2 by blub01
Elip 2 Front by kruegchen
Elip 2 Front by kruegchen

Corresponding articles from our community

Tims Elip

Tims Elip

The way here

After filling my small student room for years with sound from my old 5.1 system of a very well-known brand, something better had to be found for my first real living room. 5.1 was out of the question because of the room layout and it also did not suit my taste at all.

So it happened that I began, gathering information on "real" loudspeakers and visited the one or other forums ; -). There, the designs by Lautsprecherbau.de quickly caught my eye.

Unfortunately, I live extremely far away from Rhine and Ruhr which got in the way of a listening appointment. I thus searched for a friendly community member in my vicinity where I could listen to the SB 36. Inspired by the forceful and rich sound, I was quickly fired up to make something similar myself. I had long since stopped considering loudspeakers off the shelf.

Wood


Unfortunately I do not have as an extensive tool collection as many others here; I also lack a suitable place where I can, for example, ply my router. So after an estimate by the local cabinetmaker, I had the housing parts made mitred out of 19mm MDF. An unbeatable price and as it turned out, top-notch workmanship

Gluing, soldering and painting


First I quickly soldered the frequency crossovers together and screwed them to the lowest bracing panel as recommended. So I was able to incorporate the crossovers with cables directly into the housing while gluing it together saving myself the subsequent fumbling around. It is really tight in the Elip 2. Luckily I (still) live alone allowing me to convert my entire balcony into a workshop.

The gluing together turned out to be pretty easy. From the many sets of instructions, I knew exactly where I had to be careful and the flat dowels simplified the centering of the boards immensely. Everything fit together perfectly. In retrospect, however, I realized that in addition to the tension straps, some clamps would not have been bad to press the front panel and the recessed back together evenly. Thus, I had to fill in several small gaps. For this, I used simple MDF putty out of the tube. This could not be seen and was very easy to use and polish.

After I had filled and pre-polished (180) everything with the random orbital sander (unfortunately too little), I did the priming. Here, I can express recommend Hesse Lignal hydro-insulating filler HP 670-9343. I applied three layers of primer with it with a polishing between each layer (240) and to date (four months), no protruding edges have formed on the finished loudspeaker. The stuff is easy to use and polish. After the final polishing of the primer (320), I then painted two layers of white matt Schöner Wohnen paint onto the primed housing using the fine foam material roller. It came out that a little experience is helpful for here. The edges in particular proved to be a problem. Generally, I can recommend the Schöner Wohnen paint. It goes on well and the final result is impressive in spite of a small goof on my part. Here again, I would like to give you the following advice: Strength lies in calmness and the first cut is crucial! You can't polish enough away at the beginning especially on the cutting surfaces. After the priming, everything should really be super smooth; otherwise you see everything afterwards. Better to polish it once again more coarsely and prime it again.

Next time, I will use multiplex beech and varnish it with clear varnish - looks super and takes ALOT less time (however costs more) ...

During the housing construction, it turned out that the delivery time for the GDS 182 could not be kept. The end of April became "maybe" the end of June. Intertechnik was, however, very obliging and after some time, all the parts were complete. Finally I was able to complete my new treasures.

The last mile


Still today, I ask myself whether I did the right thing with the Sonofil. I stowed all four packages in one box each and pre-drilled the holes for the chassis as recommended. At the same time I discovered that a rotating drill and Sonofil did not go together...
After that was settled and the cotton wadding was stowed again in its allotted place, quickly solder the chassis (tweeter reverse-poled as described in the construction plan) and build them in. Unfortunately, I did not take pictures of this process because my darlings were almost finished and I was so excited that I simply forgot.

Set them up quickly, lay the cables and then the big moment finally arrived. The loudspeakers, which I had not yet heard, delivered their first tones!! Everything functioned correctly first time, the crossovers were soldered and the chassis all active. Relief.

And the sound: a little exhausted, a bit dusty and also a little sweaty, I plopped down on my sofa and just listened. Wow. I was surprised right away by the even more pronounced bass. I had not expected that at all. Also the presence and clarity of the tweeters made me smile which had already spread all over my face. Since then, I listen to music a whole different way. It was, however, sometimes difficult to explain that it is not the fault of the self-built boxes when a guest inserts his alleged favourite song and is not immediately blasted away by a deep bass blubbering as with the home 150-euro movie sound system.

A friend who is a metal worker made the feet. They are made of solid stainless steel and weigh about eight kilos (around 18 pounds) each... I think they really stand out :)

All in all, I can say that the Elip 2 project was absolutely successful. The loudspeakers are a lot of fun whether with movies or music! It will certainly not be the last project I do in this direction.

Nichos Elip

Nichos Elip


Nicho´s Elip-2

It's not as if I'd nursed the ambition to build my own loudspeakers for a long time. I had recently acquired a 5.1 system, mostly to watch films. But was still on the lookout for a good solution for listening to music. The need to get some decent stereo speakers was therefore evident. And it only took a few minutes of googling to hit upon the subject of do-it-yourself speakers, and on Udo's page not much later. After intensive reading and study I then decided to just give it a try. I opted for the Elip-2. Don't ask me why I went for these speakers, the things just immediately appealed to me. Call it intuition :)

Planning and shopping:

So I ordered the required technical bits and made a list of all the materials needed to create my own customized cabinets. The intention was to complete the cabinets before the parcel with the technical components arrives. That the latter was already at my place Zum Glück stellte sich heraus, dass ein Freund der Familie, der gleich um die Ecke wohnt, eine 1A-Holzwerkstatt samt Oberfräse besitzt. Bin also hingefahren und wir haben die Sache gemeinsam in Angriff genommen. Fräszirkel gebaut und alles drum und dran. Das Ergebnis hat mich mehr als zufrieden gestellt, bin im Nachhinein tatsächlich froh, dass das gekaufte Gerät defekt war. Hätte das ohne jegliche Erfahrung niemals so gut hinbekommen. Am gleichen Abend habe ich noch die Gehäuse zusammengeleimt und über Nacht trocknen lassen. Am nächsten Morgen habe ich dann die Kanten geschliffen. Es folgten 2 Grundierungen, nach nochmaligem mehrstündigen Warten habe ich dann die erste Schicht Farbe aufgetragen. Mit dem Ergebnis, das ich mit einer gewöhnlichen Lackierrolle erzielt habe, war ich mehr als zufrieden. Ich hätte nicht gedacht, dass man two (!!!) days later took me by surprise. I hadn't even managed to get to the DIY superstore by then. Given this additional impetus, I hit the road the very next day and got everything I needed. Back home I immediately started marking everything out on the front panels. Directly afterwards I was going to work with the router I'd just bought in the DIY shop. Power on, 30 seconds of milling, and that was it. The thing started to smoke and the drill head was jammed. So back to the DIY store the very next day in the hope of getting it exchanged. When they told me that I can't have a replacement but need to send in the broken appliance I initially thought that this was the end of my holiday project. So I went back home in something of a funk...

Cabinet construction:

But I happily found out that a friend of the family who lives just around the corner has a top notch wood workshop, including router. So I went there and we tackled this together. Built a milling circle and what have you. I was more than satisfied with the result and am actually really glad in hindsight that the appliance I'd bought was defective. I would have never been able to wangle it this well given my lack of experience. I glued the cabinets together the very same evening and left them to dry overnight. The next morning I sanded the edges. This was followed by 2 coats of primer before applying the first coat of paint after another wait of several hours. I actually found the results I achieved with a no-frills paint roller quite impressive. Who would have thought that I would be able to spread the paint so evenly with that? After a second coat of paint I then brought the parquet sealant into play and coated everything 3 times. I'd also bought a replacement roll for the paint roller for this. And as I was not completely wowed by the results yet, I finally oversprayed the whole thing with a satin finish varnish.

Creating the crossover:

This is the part that had intimidated me the most in the run-up. I had never soldered before or studied electric circuits and all they imply to any extent. I did have the reassuring comfort, though, that I would always be able to resort to an electrician in case of an emergency. But I would have much preferred to do it all on my own, naturally. So I just took a calm and very relaxed look at the thing and was able to discover that it is much simpler than I'd originally thought. And then I installed the crossover on a small piece of MDF that I had left over.I drilled holes at the respective places, glued the components down and then threaded their wires through self-same holes. The individual elements were then connected at the back. Careful study of the included leaflet will quickly reveal what goes where. The rest was just a formality. Having no previous experience with soldering, I initially made the mistake, however, of bridging the gaps between individual components with the soldering tin itself. But then when I asked if that was OK here in the forum I was told that copper wire would be better for this So I changed the bits in question again which only took about 20 minutes, no problem.

Conclusions:

When I connected the loudspeakers to my AV receiver I had huge expectations and was most of all very excited. Switch on the music and Bob's your uncle! But then....what a disappointment! Everything sounded totally tinny. After 20 minutes of wild button pushing I finally came up with  the idea of providing a new setup for my surround system (now including the Elip-2 as front speakers), and voila! The sounds coming out of them were heavenly, all of a sudden. So my initial shock had only been attributable to my own stupidity after all, and not the speakers. I have been using them for ca. 2 weeks now, listening to music, watching videos and playing with the Xbox, and everything is just great. I really get a lot of fun out of them and would readily recommend them to everybody! Already hatching plans to build an Elip-2 center, too!



Kind regards from Nicho

I.T. Intertechnik
I.T. Intertechnik Kerpen GmbH Located at Europaring 28, 50170 , Kerpen Germany, . Phone: +490227390840. https://www.facebook.com/Lautsprecherbau https://twitter.com/it_intertechnik https://plus.google.com/111120951705739054145/about https://plus.google.com/102648362843691426793/about https://www.youtube.com/user/lautsprecherbau