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Good Old Stereo
Good Old Stereo
Good Old Stereo
Good Old Stereo
Good Old Stereo

Good Old Stereo


Order-No. 1385236

421,20 € / Piece
incl. Vat.
free shipping to Germany
353.95 € excl. Vat
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Details

SB417 Loudspeaker kit with SB Acoustics loudspeaker drivers, without cabinet

Features

Ways 3-way
Cabinet prinzip Bassreflex
Impedance 4
Heigth (cm) 120,00
Length (cm) 22,80
Depth (cm) 34,00
Application Floorstanding
Brand / Manufacture SB Acoustics
Price range 300-500 Euro

Corresponding articles from our community

Franks SB 417

Franks SB 417


Hello, loudspeaker builder community!

It’s high time for me to write my first assembly report. Now that I’ve been enjoying the sounds of my SB 417 for several weeks, I want to let you in on its creation story. It all started in the summer of 2012. I was looking for something to balance out my stressful work life, and I thought back to my childhood and youth. In those days, inspired by a hobby-corner TV show, I had a lot of fun building my own speakers. Now I wanted to revive that hobby, but this time to produce somewhat more sophisticated systems. After some internet research, I ran across Loudspeakerbuilding.com and devoured a huge number of assembly reports.

As my first project, I built two SD315BP subwoofers for our party area and home theater, since the existing PA system was missing the bottom octave in home-theater mode. Unfortunately I can’t contribute any pictures of this project because I was caught up in the excitement of the work and didn’t have the camera handy. After discovering all the low-cost DIY possibilities – which surprised me – I immediately started looking for my next project. I wanted it to be something from the Blues Class so that I could rediscover my extensive music collection. I stumbled across the SB 417, which fit well in our apartment because of its narrow profile. The SB 240 was one size too big for me. Since it’s a long drive to the listing room for me – according to Google Maps, 419 km and more than 4 hours – I decided to buy the SB 417 assembly kits sight unseen (or rather, unheard). I can now say that I wasn’t disappointed!

After a few days, the shipment arrived in late September and I was finally able to get started. I had the MDF cut to size at my local hardware store. To make sure I wouldn’t have to throw away the whole cabinet, I started by cutting the openings for the chassis into the front panels.



Illustration 1: Everything cleanly sketched out

Since I didn’t have a routing template for my router, I built my own simple routing template from wood scraps. First I glued a slat to a board and then drilled two holes at the appropriate intervals, which I used to attach the guide bars for the router with two screws. I sawed a slit in the board so the router head could reach its actual application spot. The guide in the middle of the template was provided by a 4-mm screw that I countersank about 1 cm behind the end of the slit. I was able to create a routing template, using the simplest in-house materials, that can easily cut out even the smallest radius.



Illustration 2: The router using the homemade routing template 

The depressions for the chassis were cut into the wood using the router; the jigsaw then cut the actual openings out of the wood. After that came the “test fittings” for the chassis elements. I was lucky – they fit. The extra millimeter I had cut out wasn’t a problem because the coat of paint would make up for it. I did cut out a little too much with the jigsaw for the tweeter, though. I had to fill in those gaps with some wood putty, but I wasn’t sure whether I could still make the tweeter air-tight in the cabinet. In order to make sure that the air set in motion by the bass couldn’t whistle out through the tweeter, I used wood slats and scraps to build a small chamber for the calotte. I vowed to make the cutouts a little smaller for my next project, and to do the rest with a file. Since the volume loss is much smaller than 10%, though, I’m not worried about losing sound quality due to the extra chamber.



Illustration 3: Extra chamber behind the tweeter, made of wood scraps

Once the rough construction of the cabinet was finished, it was time to build the frequency crossover. First I tried to optimize the component positions on paper. After some email correspondence with a couple of suggestions and tips, the crossover layout was decided, and I attached them to wooden boards. The wiring was done on the back side, and the whole thing was then attached to the rear wall of the box using spacers.



Illustration 4: Frequency crossover, Frank’s SB417



Illustration 5: Frequency crossover with spacer in the box

Once the crossovers were in place, I filled the cabinet with Sonofil and glued on the second side wall. Heavy paint buckets provided the necessary pressure. I could hardly wait to put in the chassis elements, and I was anxious for the first listening test. A day later, it was finally time. The speakers stood in our apartment in their rough MDF clothing, and I connected them to my Pioneer VSX -921 at Output B. I turned off all of the bells and whistles that might influence the sound, and the first listening session began.

Wow !!

Now I know what they mean by Blues Class. I have two MB Quart S980s standing in my office, but the SB 417s were better than those speakers in every way. The SB 417s have more pressure and precision in the bass range. The highs are clearer and don’t tend toward sharpness the way the MBs do. The whole stage feels larger and more precise with the SB 417s. These comparisons involve very subtle nuances, or as the SB 417 assembly report so nicely puts it, “you need to have the same background in order to understand the description.”

Even though I resisted the suggestion to come in for an extensive listening test because of the long drive, my enthusiasm wins out here. The SB 417 is a lot of fun, and I really am discovering my music collection all over again.

That could be the end of the assembly report, except that I haven’t talked about the finish for the boxes. Before that step, though, 4 weeks went by. My wife was starting to think that the natural wood color of the MDF looked pretty nice, too. But I wasn’t completely satisfied with the original outfit. Inspired by the Loudspeakerbuilding magazine, I started to think about the look of the boxes. The cabinet for the Little Princess with beech glued onto the sides looked very good – but my cabinets were already finished. The article about the Eton 2U XXL finally gave me the idea for the cabinet design. The front and back sides are painted black, and the sides have pine boards glued on, which would look good with our furniture.

In mid-November I finally had a couple days of vacation to finish my SB 417 project. I took the chassis elements out of the cabinet one more time – good thing I had saved the boxes. Then I sanded and primed the cabinets. There was the usual cycle of sanding and painting. I rounded off the side pieces and adjusted them, then painted them with clear varnish. In addition to glue, I used 6 countersunk screws to attach the side pieces – that made the assembly quite a bit easier.



Illustrations 6, 7 and 8: Sanding and painting, and the rounded side pieces.

Once I had attached the side pieces to the cabinets, I painted the entire cabinet with a layer of clear varnish.

Now the SB 417s have taken up their rightful place in our living room, regaling us with their music. Even if the cabinets aren’t perfect and you can tell it’s a homemade project, I’m happy with the results. For an office guy who doesn’t normally do much carpentry or painting work, I came up with some pretty nice-looking boxes.

I hope you enjoyed my assembly report, and that I encouraged a few of you to try your own projects. My next project is already underway, because the “evil sound cubes” in the TV corner just don’t measure up anymore. I’ve already ordered the Vota 1 and 3 assembly kits.

Thank you again for all your help.

Greetings from the Wilstermarsch region!

Frank



SB 417

SB 417

Building loudspeakers is no different from real life: there are winners and losers. The second category definitely includes the SB 17 RNXC-4, the four-ohm version of the beloved bass mid-range speaker from the SB 18, SB 36 and the SB 240. Here we can already see that the brother has claimed all of the spots, leaving almost no room for its structurally almost identical twin to demonstrate its usefulness to the world. What are you supposed to do with it, anyway? It’s no good for the SB 36, and no one needs an SB 18 assembly kit with fewer ohms – especially not when today’s AV receivers prefer 8 ohms. We consider the multi-channel trend to be irreversible, so it is becoming more and more important to invent coordinating sets of different-sized loudspeakers where the individuals don’t have any chance of self-actualization. Still, as habitual stereo listeners, we can see another niche where this previously overlooked device would fit in well. Following the standard terminology, we gave it the explanatory name SB 417. And just to say it loud and clear right at the start: we really don’t care whether this assembly suggestion will also work for a home theater, be it for films or to fulfill the female acceptance factor. It was designed exclusively for enjoying music in good old stereo, and there’s no need to debate that.

Equipment

Even at first glance, it’s immediately clear which family the SB 17 RNXC-4 belongs to. The characteristically tall basket rim is common to all of the SB chassis elements, along with the shimmering gray-black color of the smooth paper membrane and the highly curved dust cover in the same color. The rubber surround material promises a significant lift, while the high-set, rear-ventilated centering piece reveals the 16-mm-tall 35.5 mm voice coil made of copper-coated aluminum wire on a fiberglass base. The enormous magnet, with a 10-cm diameter, has a large pole-piece hole; the air vent is 5 mm tall, so the linear lift is a full 11 mm. A copper plate on the pole piece ensures low inductivity and efficiently reduces noise. Since we haven’t even introduced the SB 17 RNXC-4 in a chassis test before, we will use this report to tell you about the data we measured for it.


Data sheet, SB-Acoustics SB 17NRXC-4

Order No.: 1382313


Measurements as a zip-file

Equipment:

Membrane: cardboard, impregnated Air gap height: 5 mm
Surround: rubber Linear excursion: 11 mm
Basket: Die-cast Magnet diameter: 100 mm
Pole piece hole: yes Mounting holes: 4
Centering: Raised flat spider Outside diameter: 171 mm
magnetic shielding: no Installation opening: 144 mm
Voice coil: 35,5 mm Milling depth: 6,5 mm
Voice coil former: Fiberglass Installation depth: 81,5 mm

Parameters:

Fs 38,7 Hz Mms 15,3 grams
Diameter 122 mm BL 5,78 Tm
ZMax 74 Ohm VAS 21,6 Liter
Re 3,1 Ohm dBSPL 87,6 dB/1w/1m
Rms 0,47 kg/s L1kHz 0,14 mH
Qms 7,86   L10kHz 0,05 mH
Qes 0,34   SD 118 cm²
Qts 0,33   MMD 14,5 grams
Cms 1,11 mm/N Zmin 3,65 Ohm

Measurements:

Frequency response and phase Impedance Frequency response under 0/ 30/ 60°°
Distortion for 90 dB Step response Waterfall


Sketchup-file or a PDF.

Crossover-network

If you want to operate four chassis elements with four ohms each in your boxes, you could connect them in parallel and hope that the amplifier has a functional protection circuit strong enough to protect them from a merciless death by overheating. A better option is to couple the chassis elements into a single unit by way of some clever wiring, which in turn creates a four-ohm load for the amp in the end. There are two possible versions: first, two pairs of chassis elements can be connected in parallel and then sequentially. Second, they can be connected sequentially in pairs and then in parallel. The first version is a good idea if all of the chassis elements will be operated in the same frequency range, which allows them to use a shared crossover. That’s manageable up to a separation at 400 Hz, but then who’s going to reproduce the mid-range?

In order to assign all four SB 17-4s to the basement level, as well as using two for the range up to the tweeter, the top and bottom chassis elements need to be connected to a shared crossover branch, which corresponds to the second version. That creates a two-and-a-half-way box in which the basses are only decoupled using one coil. You can see their positive influence on the interactions between the other two basses by looking at the red curve compared to the green one. It does not yet include any components, which creates strong dips at 1.8 and 3.6 kHz. The distance from each chassis to the microphone differs, which means that the phase descriptions do not match in these areas.

It was hard in any case to measure the SB 417 in my small 4 x 4 x 4 m room; the normal microphone distance is completely meaningless when there are five sound sources distributed over more than one meter of height. Therefore we had to go up to the limits of what could be measured and accept a few unattractive waves, which are particularly visible in the angle diagrams. For the upper bass mid-range speakers, without any consideration for the other members of the SB family (as we mentioned earlier), we built a third-order filter, which produced the blue curve. The high notes also created waves, which I didn’t need to worry about. The 12 dB filter created the green curve in the branch diagram. The resulting total curve reveals the cleanly crafted separation between the five chassis elements involved.

Since tube enthusiasts often prefer to use a box with 90 dB/ 1 m/ 2.83 V that is designed exclusively for listening to music (for precisely that reason), it was essential to measure out an impedance correction even though the peak of the separation frequency was only 9 ohms. It is shown with a dashed line in the circuit plan, since it will be used exclusively with tubes. The plan also shows you that all of the chassis elements are connected in phase.



The usual SB 417 measurement diagrams fit well here, some of which once again used our ATB. The distortion measurements, the step response and the waterfall just look nicer there, even if it is just a representation of the same material.

Measurement SB 417:

Frequency response and phase Impedance Frequency response under 0/ 30/ 60°
Distortion for 90 dB Step response Waterfall


All of these parallel and sequential maneuvers are probably making some of your heads spin at this point, which could lead to errors in assembling the SB 417. So we left more room for the installation phase this time and took a couple of explanatory photos. The associated texts can be read as captions by clicking on each image.

Ein Hilfsbrett sagt dem Bohrer, an welchen Stellen er das schwarze MDF durchlöchern darfDamit die Polklemmen beim Aufdrehen der Muttern nicht ständig festgehalten werden müssen, habe ich eine dünne Metallstange durch ihre Querbohrungen gesteckt.An den Weichen sind die Kabel angelötet. Wohin sie führen sollen, habe ich drangeschrieben.An die Kabel zum Terminal wurden die Lötfähnchen gelötet. Das untergelegte Hilfsbrett verhindert Brandflecke auf dem MDF.Die Weichen werden mit Heißkleber auf die Rückwand unter die untere Versteifung geklebt.Ein Schraubendreher mit Nussbit hilft beim Festschrauben der Lötfahnen auf den Polklemmen.Wie es anschließend innen aussieht, verrät die Innenansicht.Da die Kabel durch das Baumaterial dem Auge verborgen sind, habe ich die korrekten Chassisverbindungen per Hand auf das Foto gemalt.Nach dem Ausrichten der Chassis werden die Schraublöcher vorgebohrt und dann die Lautsprecher angeschraubt.


Sound


The listening report starts out in a somewhat unusual way this time. Two small pictures without much content, on differently colored backgrounds, give you a quick impression of how this change can shape your perception of the same object.



The colors on the black and white backgrounds are identical, and the font is the same size. Nonetheless, the bottom “ROT” (red) seems thicker, and the top “BLAU” (blue) seems lighter.

What does that have to do with loudspeakers, you rightfully ask. When it comes to listening, too, it’s also true that you need to have the same background in order to understand the description. When we talk about a contoured bass with good traceability, there’s no guarantee that our description matches up with what you are imagining. Only by listening to a pair of boxes together can we create a shared reference – aside from the fact that everything we hear is also evaluated subjectively. As a result, even the most euphoric list of every imaginable superlative can at best make us curious about the described object, make us want to hear it for ourselves. Whether enthusiasm or disappointment wins out in the end can usually only be determined after the speakers are built. We’re cat lovers, so we don’t like to keep the famous one in the bag – we encourage potential do-it-yourselfers to come in to our studio and listen to all of our suggested projects at length. That’s why you should consider the following sentences as an appetizer, the truth of which is (almost) always subject to your own findings.

We have already pointed out plenty of times in this report that the SB 417 is meant exclusively for stereo listening, so there was no trouble choosing the right amplifier for our test. We aren’t sticklers for principle, so you’ll never hear us say, “I only listen to tubes” or “I only use transistors.” Our goal is very modest: we want a signal transmitter that doesn’t set any premature limits. That can be said in good conscience about several KT 88 tube amplifiers, and the price is right too. So we hooked up the boxes, turned them on and started up the music. A little guitar-jangling from our last shopping excursion happened to be on the turntable and it was Friday night, so we let ourselves be teleported straight to San Francisco. It was breathtaking to hear how fast Paco de Lucia and Al Di Meola plucked the strings as they projected “Mediterranean Sundance” into the listening room in 3-D. The SB 417 didn’t complain a bit as it beautifully reproduced what felt like five hundred thousand individual notes with incredible dynamicism. Fortunately, when the recording was made in 1981, today’s standard compression approach hadn’t been popularized yet. After this demonstration of fundamental speed more or less in the mid-range, the almost 500 cm² of membrane surface – the same area as a #30 bass, but distributed across a meter of height here – showed how much fun it is to let your belly be massaged by high-pressure basses. Keith Emerson volunteered for that part, impressively using the organ at Royal Festival Hall on “Emerson, Lake and Palmer” for his progressive rock spiked with plenty of classical and jazz elements. Our familiar old listening couch rattled pretty nicely when he blew the air through the really big pipes for his impressive final chord.

Since we were already well on our way to classical music, Mahler was a must, given that May 18 was the 100th anniversary of his death. His Third Symphony, recorded 25 years ago by the Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra with Eliahu Inbal conducting, left no doubts about the SB 417’s skills in this musical genre. The cymbals crashed, the kettledrum went straight for the gut, and the space and positioning of the instruments were perfect. There wasn’t a hint of scratchiness when we played Ravel’s Sonata for violin and cello. That is probably thanks to the tweeter, which at less than 40 euros manages to make some of its rivals for the listener’s affections look downright cheap. Overall, our design using the previously neglected SB 17-4 was more than satisfactory. Calling it a loser now will just make a liar of you in the next listening test.

Let us add a couple more sentences here to avoid the inevitable questions: the SB 417 fits seamlessly into the phalanx of SB boxes. It is a little more high-pressure and impressive than the SB 36 and not quite as deep as the SB 240, so it fills the gap between them both tonally and visually. At the same time, it can be independent, since we aren’t planning to make a matching center component out of the upper piece – but I’m sure we don’t have to point that out anymore by now.





Chassis 4 x SB 17 NRXC-4 Wood list in 19 mm MDF, black, per box:
  1 x SB 26 STAC-4  
    120,0 x 34,0 (2x) Sides
Sales Intertechnik, Kerpen 19,0 x 34,0 (2x) Lid/Floor
Construction Udo Wohlgemuth 19,0 x 116,2 (1x) Back wall
    19,0 x 112,0 (1x) Front
Function principle Bass-reflex 19,0 x 16.0 (1x) Reflex-board
Nominal imdedance 4 Ohm 19,0 x 10,0 (3x) Reinforcement board
Damping: 4 bags Sonofil  
Terminal K 30 AU pole clamps Milling depth
    Bass: 6 mm
Approx. cost per box:

 

Tweeter: 4 mm
     
Assembling kit:         360 EUR/USD Wood cutting: 50 EUR/USD

 

 

The SB 417 with SB Acoustics speakers is available from Intertechnik.

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I.T. Intertechnik Kerpen GmbH Located at Europaring 28, 50170 , Kerpen Germany, . Phone: +490227390840. https://www.facebook.com/Lautsprecherbau https://twitter.com/it_intertechnik https://www.youtube.com/user/lautsprecherbau